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Fractures

Florida injury attorneys helping victims of painful and costly fractures and bone breaks

In a healthy body, bones are extremely strong. It requires a great deal of force to break a bone, which means that, when a bone breaks, the victim has been involved in a serious accident. Often, a broken bone is not the only injury that occurred in these sorts of major accidents, but it is frequently the most severe and painful.

Fractures can involve months of healing time, often requiring victims to wear a cast and suffer major mobility impairment while they recover. In some cases, a broken bone may result in the need for physical therapy, extending the effects of the injury even longer. For older victims, a bone fracture can even have life-impairing consequences.

Fracture injury victims in Florida may have a right to compensation

If you’ve been the victim of an accident that resulted in bone fractures, we’re ready to help. Find out if you’re eligible for compensation for your injuries by contacting the tenacious and dedicated Florida bone fracture attorneys at Meldon Law.

Our committed personal injury attorneys understand the pain and suffering you’ve experienced as the result of your bone break. We want to get you every bit you’re owed as the result of your accident. Get help from the attorneys that the Florida Gators trust enough to call their official law firm partner. Contact Meldon Law as soon as possible for an assessment of your claims.

What are the different types of bone fracture injuries?

Bone fractures can vary in degree and intensity, and certain types of fractures require longer to heal than others. The main types of fractures are as follows:

  • Simple fracture: With a simple fracture, the broken bone does not break the skin and typically involves only a single break in the bone. Since the skin remains intact, these fractures are sometimes known as “closed” fractures.

  • Compound fracture: In contrast to a simple fracture, a compound fracture is one in which the bone does break the skin. These breaks are much more traumatic and can represent a medical emergency. The risk of infection is higher with a compound fracture, including sepsis (infection in the bloodstream) and osteomyelitis (infection in the bone), both of which can be fatal. A compound fracture is also known as an “open” fracture.

  • Displaced and non-displaced fracture: When a fractured bone splits into multiple pieces and those pieces shift away from one another, this is known as a displaced fracture. In a non-displaced fracture, the fragments of bone remain in place, making the break easier to repair.

  • Comminuted fracture: A bone break where the break involves multiple small fragments of bone is known as a comminuted fracture.

  • Hairline fracture: A thin break in the bone, but one that does not split the bone into two or more pieces.

  • Impacted fracture: These fractures occur when one piece of the broken bone is forced into another.

  • Spiral fracture: In this type of fracture, some portion of the bone has been twisted, creating a spiral shape to the break.

  • Oblique fracture: The break in the bone has a sloping or curving shape with an oblique fracture.

How are fractures treated?

Bone fractures are treated by joining the pieces of bone back together and immobilizing the break, with the goal of the pieces of bone rejoining and growing back together. This can be accomplished in several ways. The most common is by putting the broken limb in a cast made of plaster or fiberglass. Doctors may choose to use internal fixation to immobilize the pieces of the fractured bone. This approach utilizes screws and plates to keep the bone in place. External fixation, another technique, relies on devices placed internally both above and below the fracture on the bone, in concert with an external device that holds screws in the internal devices in place.

What are the most common causes of fracture injuries in Florida?

Fractures can occur for many reasons, but a bone does not break unless a substantial amount of force is exerted upon it. This is the case unless the fracture victim has a condition that makes bones easier to break, such as osteoporosis or certain forms of cancer. Some common causes of Florida bone fractures are:

  • Car and truck accidents
  • Slip-and-fall accidents
  • Bicycle accidents
  • Pedestrian accidents
  • Boating accidents

What sort of compensation might be available after a fracture injury in Florida?

Bone fractures are major injuries. Since they are often the result of a traumatic accident, victims of bone fractures in Florida may have additional injuries stemming from the accident, as well. Common forms of damages after a Florida bone fracture injury include:

  • Medical expenses: The full costs of treating a broken bone, including emergency medical transport and physical therapy, can run high even when the victim has health insurance. A personal injury lawsuit helps victims collect the full amount they’re owed after a fracture injury.

  • Lost wages or earning capacity: Many fractures are so severe that the victim will be forced to miss work after the injury. If the victim relied on their body for work, the broken bone could permanently affect their earning capacity. These victims can seek any lost pay—both past or future—through a legal claim.

  • Pain and suffering: Victims of a traumatic and violent accident that caused them to break a bone have a right to seek compensation for the pain and suffering they endured.

Legal Help After a Fracture Injury in Florida

Hire a law firm you can trust to help you with your legal claim after suffering a fracture. Contact the skilled Florida personal injury attorneys at Meldon Law for a consultation on your case. Call 800-373-8000 toll-free statewide for immediate assistance. Meldon Law is the law firm for you.

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